I finally canceled my$29.99, 300 daytime minute “Free and Clear” plan from the year 2000.

It’s pretty easy to talk to someone in the cancellation department. It’s the canceling that’s difficult to get done.

First of all, when you reach a person, make sure you write down their name. Ask them for first and last name, how to spell it, and ask which call center they are working in. You’ll need this, because likely they will hang up on you.

You see, Sprint’s retention department is paid based on how many cancellations they “save” i.e. don’t allow to cancel. Every call they complete without canceling service counts as a save. By getting the person’s name and location, the chances of them hanging up on you decrease dramatically as they face the prospect of getting reported to their supervisor for the practice.

Second, if you’re intent on canceling, don’t feel the need to explain yourself and chatter with the phone rep. They’ll try to ask you questions and talk you into staying. Just tell them politely that you’ve made up your mind and would like to cancel.

Finally, don’t agree to pay for any days of service past the current day. They will try to bill you for an entire billing cycle. The phone rep will say something to the effect of “ok, you’re canceled as of today, and you can make calls up until the end of your billing cycle.” This is code for “We’re charging you for more service than you want.” Don’t agree to it. Ask to speak to a supervisor. Don’t take no for an answer.

I know for a fact that a supervisor can make this happen, as I had to take this route myself. The supervisor told me she could cancel my service with no billing for future service “as a 1-time courtesy.” No kidding it’s a one-time thing – I’m canceling my service after all.

Use this method, and you should be “free and clear” of Sprint in no time.

Be Sociable, Share!